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Archive for January, 2009


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Quickie Cigar Reviews: A Menage-a-Trois

28 Jan

Ok, ok. So I’ve been enjoying more than I have been writing. Or at least trying to enjoy. I had three cigars this week that I wanted to review but kept forgetting to put up. One was “Meh”, one was “eh.. I’ll have it again” and the last was another “Meh”. I find it frustrating that when I find really good cigars (like the CAO LX2) to try other cigars afterwads. It tends to be a bit of a letdown. Then again, it could be just that they weren’t that great to begin with.

Perfecto #1

Perfecto #1

Mosaico Cameroon Perfecto #1 (medium): These were on sale at Famous and discontinued. I can see why. The mixture of the sweet Cameroon wrapper with the Honduran tobacco, in this particular blend, didn’t create a flavour I expected. It was sweet at times with a harsher flavour. Now, I’ll admit to preferring Dominican and Nicaraguan tobaccos but I thought I’d give this one a try. The construction wasn’t bad and it stayed fairly lit but the flavour left a little bit for my palate to desire. I still have 19 more of these so I’ll try again in a month or two after they’ve aged some and see if that helps (it has before for other cigars). Rating: 6/10

Barclay-Rex Capana D'Oro Vintage Robusto

Barclay-Rex Capana D'Oro Vintage Robusto

Barclay-Rex Capana D’Oro Vintage Robusto (mild-medium): I always like trying different cigars, particularly those that aren’t mainstream. When I was at Barclay-Rex last week, I noticed a cigar without a band. This is a special blend made for Barclay by Don Pepin. It’s a Nicaraguan blend with a Nicaraguan Rosado wrapper, one of my favourites. Although the construction wasn’t the best it was still an ok cigar. The flavour was very mild. I did put a note in with Don Pepin’s website to see if I could get more information on this average priced cigar ($7.50 at their Broad Street location) but haven’t heard back yet. It did tend to be a bit smokey at times but the ash was a solid consistency in it’s darker grey-black form. Rating: 7/10

Ashton VSG Enchantment

Ashton VSG Enchantment

Ashton VSG Enchantment Robusto (full): I love the Tres Mystique and thought I’d give the Enchantment a try. It was ok but not as flavourful for me as the Tres Mystique. Although well constructed and burned well, it didn’t “zing” me like the other. I’d probably still give it a try again if given the opportunity. There were some harsh tones in the Dominican tobacco and the Ligero tobacco didn’t come out in the fullness as I expected. Rating: 7/10

On a fun note, yesterday I got into a discussion with a BOTL about the term “close but no cigar”. The history of this term stems from when fairground games of chance gave away cigars as the prize (a hugely unlikely possibility today). If you won, you got the cigar. If you miss, well, it was “close but no cigar”.  You can read more about other cigar phrases, in different languages no less, here.

 

Cigar Review: Double the Fun with Lx2

23 Jan

CAO Lx2 Robusto

CAO Lx2 Robusto

Cigar Name: CAO Lx2 Robusto (5 x 52)

Cigar Description: Nicaraguan wrapper enveloping 100% Ligero Dominican and Nicaraguan long-fillers

Cigar Strength: Full

Review of the Cigar itself: Ah, the weekend. It kinda started early for me today since I finished teaching early. And since I got rave reviews from my students, I figured I was more than deserving of a good cigar. I had recently seen through a variety of twitter cigar folks discussion about CAO’s LX2 cigar and I figured this would be one that would fit into that classification. I soon discovered that I wouldn’t be disappointed.

The wrapper is a beautiful dark, dark chocolate-like oily wrapper. The dual-bands displayed elegant detail around an extremely well constructed cigar. As I lit the foot and took my first draw, I couldn’t escape the bitter-sweet mocha taste that tickled my tongue and lit up my taste buds. Oh my. This was a great start and it was one that would eventually convince me that I had a new favourite CAO cigar. That first draw was a tad difficult but once it got going,

Enjoying it too well...

Enjoying it too well...

it was wonderful. The aroma was a wonderful earthy spicey and mocha scent, wrapped with deeper allusions of coffee. Since mocha coffee is one of my regular coffee choices when possible, this was almost like smoking my favourite coffee drink.

I blathered away with some BOTL via twitter and went to take pictures when I noticed how quickly the cigar seemed to disappear. I had been enjoying the wonderful flavours so much that the cigar had nearly dwindled away. There were a few moments of rich smoke but these didn’t take away from the cigar. In fact, they added to it as they were infused with a rich, deep earthy scent twisted with hints of paprika and wood. The cigar maintained its burn well, even when I got distracted.  I was able to puff a little and get it going again. Only once did I actually need to fire up my Blazer a second time to get it going. The ash remained solid until I forcibly knocked it off.

As I got down to the last third and nearly to a nub, the sweet mocha savoriness remained on my tongue, almost like my tastebuds were trying to capture the flavour for later enjoyment.  I tasted bits of walnuts and cedar. The nub gave me very distinct black pepper taste. Since I’m often over-sensitive to pepper, this would normally cause me reason to pause but this was actually a pleasant taste. For whatever reason, it made me think of when I put pepper on my salty fries — a very tasty and mouth-water thought (for those of you that eat meat, think peppery steak).

A good burn..

A good burn..

For a full cigar it wasn’t overwhelming. This is, to me, an indication of a well-designed and excellently constructed cigar. If you can enjoy it without having to worry, then the manufacturer has found that “sweet” spot. I almost regretted sending the 2nd stick I had to someone else as part of a cigar bomb but I’m also glad I did send it. They would also get to enjoy this as much as I did. This will be put on my list of top 5 cigars I enjoy: DCM #2, AF Hemingway Short Story, Padron Anniversary 1926, Lieb 100 and now CAO’s Lx2.

The one downside I did find with it was the occassional tugboating that the cigar would do.

Burned my fingers again..

Burned my fingers again..

Often it would self correct but sometimes I did have to nudge it a bit. In fact, that and the initial draw were the only problems I ran into with this cigar. Both, however, were easy to work around. Oh.. there was another. This cigar was so enjoyable that I burned my fingers on it.

If you haven’t picked up one yet, definitely add it to your list of cigars to enjoy this year.

Enjoyed with: water and a bag of Miss Vickies Smokehose BBQ chips.

Smoke time: approximately 90 minutes

Final Review Rating: 8.9/10

 
 

Cigar Information Petition

23 Jan

I received the tweet below and humbly ask other cigar aficiandos to sign the petition as well. Being informed as to the quality of a cigar that we pay for is worthwhile, IMO.

CIGAR PEEPS: Just signed a petition for more up-to-dater blend info & websites from manufacturers. http://tinyurl.com/bwkw8h

 

Smokers’ Right: SCHIP and smoking bans

22 Jan

I’m in Manhattan this week, edu-ma-kating the masses on the wonders of virtualization. If you can consider 4 students masses. That said, because I’m at a facility that means limited cigar enjoyment this week. That’s ok. I’ll indulged in the evening. “Mah woman”, as I affectionately call her, had been bugging me to get her some Al Capone Sweets, unfiltered. I had finally remembered to order them the other day and they arrived last night. We each enjoyed our “cigars”, her the Capones and me a NUB Cameroon, while watching NCIS, relaxing the evening away. I had done a few interesting purchases this week and checked out varying prices online versus the B&M (in this case, it’s Barclay-Rex in the Wall Street District).

Ok. So they are a bit more expensive but they are incredibly friendly and have huge amounts of cigar enjoyment experience so that I can ask questions without feeling ackward or out of place. And I like that. I’ve often thought how it’d be nice to open my own B&M cigar store, whether here or in Canada. But the upcoming SCHIP legislation here in the US and stiffer smoking laws in Ontario (and other parts of Canada) might leave that dream be just a dream. Now, I totally get smoking bans, particularly in public places. There are individuals who can have severe asthma attacks and suffer when faced with smoke of any kind. And they are often hard to pick out. I respect that. Ontario’s recent law banning smoking in cars where there are kids under the age of 16 is interesting and it’ll be curious to see it enforced. They’ve even gone as far to suggest that there should be a law that bans smoking in homes with children and sentences and/or fines. While I agree that one shouldn’t smoke around kids, I don’t agree with the police or government going into the house to police this. As the late Right Honourable Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau said on Dec 21, 1967: “there’s no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation“.

He’s right. Laws like this, that are nearly impossible to enforce, catch or monitor, are pretty much useless. While I understand and agree with being respectful of others, at the same time I would expect respect for my own choices. If I’m old enough to drink alcohol, eat junk food (which does far worse to the body than smoking), drive a car, kill with a gun, get some kind of disease or an unexpected child, I would think that I’m old enough to make educated decisions as to where I can smoke and if I will smoke. I don’t know how addictive cigarettes are in comparison to cigars (I’ve seen conflicting reports and nothing fully definitive, largely, I suspect, due to the kind of cigar, method of cigar smoking and quality of the tobacco in comparison to cigarettes) but during my month off from smoking, due to a cold and work, I had no cravings. George Burns lived to 100 and smoked 15-20 cigars a day. It’s too simplistic to say “Oh, you’ll get cancer”. At the very least, let me have a place where I can hang out to relax with friends to smoke and enjoy.

I should have the right to enjoy life too, no?

The US seems to be going more and more down this route as well. While I applaud the Inauguration of Obama this month, it does worry me what SCHIP will be when it goes through (and I have no doubts that it will). SCHIP imposes a tax on cigarette and cigar smoking. Honestly, it should be separated since it’d be like imposing a tax on gas guzzlers and efficient cars. What’s curious about this is that the proposed tax is so high that it may discourage people from smoking and they’ll, in turn, lose their tax base. Given that the market isn’t the best right now and the goal is to create jobs, this may do the opposite, in fact.

Don’t get me wrong. I understand and think that the principle of ensuring that **ALL** kids get medical attention in such a manner that parents don’t have to worry about the financial stuff is good. I do come from a country (Canada) where this kind of health care has been around for years and is ingrained into the Canadian culture. It’s rough times like now that makes that kind of a system an excellent one. And if you look at many countries that has some kind of national health care you’ll find that “sin” taxes aren’t the method of funding for these kinds of systems. If anything, it’s administered at a federal level with disbursements to provincial/state/local levels. Health care for the year 2006 was pegged around $2 trillion dollars. If everyone paid $500 (since not all portions of health care should be covered — just immediate, routine visits, etc. Elective surgeries should be relegated to out-of-pocket stuff), then you’d have enough to cover everything without worry.

I suppose it’s too idealistic to assume that a solution will be found that will please everyone. I would only hope that the solution chosen actually makes sense and ensures that my right to enjoy life as I choose to, without prying eyes into my bedroom, will also be respected.

 

Cigar Review: The Essence of Esencia

18 Jan
esencia1

Esencia Belicoso 2008

Cigar Name: Esencia 2008 Belicoso (5 1/2 x 52)

Cigar Description: Nicaraguan blend of Criollo, Corojo and Ligero leaves.

Cigar Strength: Medium-Full

Review of the Cigar itself: Ah, Sundays. A day of relaxing and recharging. Well, for most people. Today is actually one of my “work” days. It’s probably a good thing since outside sounds like a lot of water and slush, definitely not a day to go out to take pictures (what I sometimes do on a nice Sunday). So, as I puttered through my variety of geeky things I figured I’d enjoy a cigar or two. As I went through my main humidor, it had occurred to me that it was a perhaps time to get a new, larger one so I wouldn’t have two humidors (plus a tupperdor) to dig through to find something interesting. I came across this cigar that a SOTL,  theonlyjoan, had recently bombed me with (amongst a few others). This is a new cigar that was introduced last year by Palio (Bother of the Leaf, Inc.).

esencia2

Smokey stuff..

The wrapper is a dark, oily chocolate colour with a few prominent viens and evidently well constructed. The look and feel in my hands of the cigar itself suggested attention had been given to it. I smelled the wrapper and got hints of mocha and spice. As I lit it and took in my first draw, I got a wonderful flavour of pepper and spices, with a mild hint of cedar in the background. It is a bit of smokier cigar than what I’m used to but the aroma that wafted from it was very pleasant to the nose. The ash is almost a black or dark, dark grey and stayed solid throughout the cigar, requiring very little tapping with no flaking for me to worry about. This cigar was so tasty that I went through most of it before I realized it. This is the kind of cigar that is easily enjoyed while watching a game or reading the latest issue of Smoke, letting the day pass on it’s own time.

esencia3

Down to the fingers..

As I got mid-way through the cedar a faint hint of leather began to appear in the background. Removing the band proved a little tricky as it was glued tightly but it eventually released without any damage to the wrapper. As I continued further into the cigar, watched the blue and grey smoke dance in the air. It was almost a magical dance of the different flavours that each of the variety of leaves brought together. I had to relight the cigar once when I got too distracted looking for 300-500 count humidors online. It relit easily and didn’t need any further relights. As I got into the nub, the cigar got hot and I let it cool a little before I continued. As I carefully balanced the cigars between my fingers I realized that I will need that new humidor sooner than later thanks to this cigar as I’ve found another one that I like enough to contemplate buying a box or two of. This is one of the few cigars that I nearly smoked down to the point where only ash remained.

I will say that this is a brand to watch in 2009 as they become more widely known. I have a suspicion that this will become a somewhat popular brand. Only three places sell this online but there are more B&Ms that sell this in store. Get some while you can.

Enjoyed with: water

Smoke time: approximately 75 minutes

Final Review Rating: 9/10

 
 

Cigar Store Review: OK Cigars (Soho, Manhattan, NY)

17 Jan
okcigars

OK Cigars Neon Sign

Today, I sit in my home office, enjoying a AVO Domaine #20 I picked up yesterday. The temperature in NYC had dipped well below the freezing mark (F) into negative numbers, making it hard to enjoy the sun and sometimes harder to enjoy a cigar on the breeze. But it does make it good weather to go and explore a good cigar store. I usually, when in Manhattan and teaching, go to the Barclay-Rex on Wall Street. But I won’t be there until next week and I had a cigar bomb to do (if you’ve never experienced a cigar bomb, it’s when a B/SotL sends you an amazing but unexpected selection of cigars — generally creates a mess in your humidor because it may cause it to overflow, hence the name).

Anyways, since I was in the West 4th subway station area, I decided to walk down to Soho. I knew there was a nice little cigar store there called OK Cigars. I had been there before and one of the things that attracted me to it was the tobacciana. It is filled with posters, old lighters, old pipes and other great historical stuff. I love perusing these items as they show the history of cigar and pipe smoking, and history in general. And it’s the lighters in particular that interest me. I even saw a leg lighter that reminded me of the leg lamp from the movie “A Christmas Story”.

Although it has a small and tightly packed walk-in humidor, it does have some really interesting finds (and my poor victim will get to enjoy some of those) as well as some of my regular favourites: AF Short Story, AVO Domaine #20, Camacho, etc.). The staff are very friendly and knowledgeable, willing to suggest new cigars to both the newbie and aficionado alike. It does stand out in comparison to the very upscale expensive clothing, jewelry and shoe stores of the area. But the prices aren’t reflective of the area beyond being pretty standard for most Manhattan cigar places ( since rent is higher the prices tend to be higher). I don’t mind this as I do like supporting the B&M type places as much as my favourite online places.

It’s unfortunate that it doesn’t have a smoking area (at least not that I could see) but it does have a warm and friendly atmosphere. While I was there, I talked with another customer about the AVO Domaine and others I had choosen (I got about a dozen cigars). He was mildly impressed at my stash but I reminded him it’s more about enjoying and sharing with friends than it is about the cigars. So if you are in the NYC/Manhattan area, whether a regular or visiting, check them out and enjoy the trip into a bit of history.

 

Cigar Review: A Salute from one Craftsman to Another

13 Jan

Nording Torpedo

Nording Torpedo

Cigar Name: Nording Torpedo (4 x 54)

Cigar Description: Costa Rican Maduro wrapper over Nicaraguan long fillers and Mexican binder

Cigar Strength: Full

Review of the Cigar itself: This cigar, when I got it, made me think of the NUB cigars that I sometimes like for a “quick” smoke. NUBs, however, tend to be rather light on flavour. This is definitely not the case with the Nording, by Rocky Patel. This cigar was created specially for Erik Nording, whose

Erik Nording in the Shop

Erik Nording in the Shop

pipes are amongst the most sought after pipes in the world. I think if my grandfather were still alive today, I’d get him a Nording (either a Woodcock or Traditional Rustic; myself, I’d want a Churchwarden if I got into pipes). Erik has been smoking a pipe since the age of 15 and his story of how he turned his passion for making pipes as hobby into a profession, for over 40 years, is fascinating one. Today, it’s estimated that about 90% or so of the roughly 50,000 pipes produced by Nording’s facility, all handmade, are exported. Nice export for Denmark to have, no?

It’s not surprising that the construction of this cigar is so well done. Rocky Patel cigars have very good quality control and stake their reputation on often creating some of the best blends you’ll find. The wrapper is a dark, almost burnt chocolate colour, a stark contrast to the creamy but simple band. I inhaled the scent of the tobacco and was rewarded with a sweet but earthy aroma. Toasting the end of the cigar, I thought of my grandfather and how much more it would have meant if I could share this with him. He, unfortunately, passed away due to throat cancer in 1993 at the age of 75. As the smoke floated above, the rich earthy scent tickled my nose.

nording-churchwarden

Nording Churchwarden

The cigar itself had wonderfully lush sweet flavour enveloped with deeper earthy and leather tones to it. The burn on the cigar was incredibly consistent and the ash steady, even when I went outside to investigate the abundance of news helicopters dancing in the dark cloudy sky. What exactly they were searching for, I have no idea. Perhaps the tax collectors in hopes of finding more tax avenues (apparently the SCHIP tax on large cigars has been set to 52.4%, with a maximum cap of 40 cents per cigar; definitely a far cry from the feared $3-10 cap per cigar). As I stood out on the balcony and watched the world below, I drew in on the cigar. The inch or so ash remained attached even as the cold wind blustered about. I decided that it would be more enjoyable inside than out, especially in my shorts and t-shirt not provided enough of a buffer against the 39F/3C weather.

nording2

The enjoyment of a good cigar

As I sat down in front of my computer and finished off my work for the night, I enjoyed the rich flavour that the Nording offered. It definite lives up to its namesake as a fine tribute to a craftsman. So light up a Nording in salute of a man and the fine art of pipemaking.

Enjoyed with: water

Smoke time: approximately 75 minutes

Final Review Rating: 9/10

 

Cigar Review: Oh, how sweet it is!

11 Jan

Fonseca 8-9-8 Lonsdale

Fonseca 8-9-8 Lonsdale

Cigar Name: Fonseca 8-9-8 (6 x 43)

Cigar Description: Connecticut wrapper over Dominican and Mexican filler

Cigar Strength: Medium

Review of the Cigar itself: I recently did an order to Famous-Smoke for a bunch of singles and included in this “sampler” I made, was this cigar. Apparently, Famous had received the cigar in July ’08 so I thought it might be nice to try given that it had aged somewhat at the store. The wrapper almost looked green but that may have been more the light. I was a little disappointed that the head showed a crack in the wrapper, unusual for cigars from Famous. I had only had the cigar a day and perhaps it was an issue with USPS (although all the cigars had been well wrapped). I decided to not let this dissuade me. I closed my eyes and inhaled the scent of the tobacco. It was almost like sweet honey, an beautiful scent reminiscent of a summer day. Definitely an image I could use on a blaringly

Crack in the wrapper

Crack in the wrapper

cold day like today.

I wet the end and cut it with great definiteness. It sliced perfectly and far enough away from the crack in the wrapper that I figure it might hold together well. I fired up my trusty Blazer and toasted the end. Within seconds, the foot glowed a deep bright red and the taste of mocha filled my mouth. While the wrapper wasn’t in the best shape, the flavour definitely made up for. I examined the cigar more as I smoked it. Prominent veins shot up pushing on the wrapper like so many sandy mesas. The ash was a series of stark contrasts between the snowy white and darker black, almost a competition between the two filler countries. The aroma that wafted to my nose carried a nice hint of nuts, almost a deep nutty smell.

Crack begins a break

Crack begins a break

As I continued more into the cigar I noticed that the ash was rather flaky and had to regularly tap it to ensure my keyboard didn’t get too covered with a mountain of burnt ash. Getting into the second third rewarded me with a whispering of leather amongst the sweetness and the continued nutty bouquet. As I continued to enjoy the cigar on my relaxing Sunday afternoon, the flavour and aroma remained pretty consistent. The band came off easily and I checked the break in the wrapper. I noticed that it had widened a bit during the burn of the cigar itself. As I got closer to it and it finally split open, I was surprised that it didn’t completely come off. In fact, it remained rather intact although

Nub is all that's left

Nub is all that's left

rather open, like a wound. The nub got so hot that I had to use a toothpick to hold the last little bit to avoid burns on my fingertips but it was worth it in the end.

Enjoyed with: water

Smoke time: approximately 75 minutes

Final Review Rating: 9/10

 
 

Cigar Review: A sweet Criollo

07 Jan

CAO Criollo Pato

CAO Criollo Pato

Cigar Name: CAO Criollo Pato (4 7/8 x 50)

Cigar Description: Criollo 98 wrapper around Nicaraguan-grown, Cuban seed filler.

Cigar Strength: Full

Review of the Cigar itself: Not sure where I got this one (perhaps from my Secret Santa on CigarPass) but it’s an interesting cigar. The wrapper is,  pronounced ‘cree-yo-yo’, a Criollo 98, Cuban-seed sweet, earthy tasting wrapper. When I first read the label I thought to myself, Oh, cool! I creole cigar. Being Acadian, this appealed to me in a heritage sense. In actuality, it means someone of pure European Spanish decent, although sometimes is translated to mean creole. The usage of it suggests, when referencing an object, that it has been made or grown locally. Perhaps a better definition is that it’s simple in it’s creation. And sometimes simpler is better.

Piglet Tail

The Piglet Tail

That is the case with this cigar. It has a nice sweet flavour to it (not an overwhelming sweetness) with a gentle twinge of leather and nuttiness in the background. The head or cap of the cigar is twisted off into a little “piglet tail”.  I had gotten into the habit of laying the head flat on my desk while cutting it so this meant I’d have to hold it and cut carefully. It actually cut quite well. The construction felt a little loose and there were a few veins along the chocolate brown wrapper but it still looked appealing. I toasted the end of it as I listened to a colleague on my Skype headset. One of the advantages of my job is that I get to work from home and often get to enjoy a cigar at my leisure while working.

criollo4

Now that's a burn

The aroma from the cigar was mild and pleasant but, sometimes, was overwhelmed by the amount of smoke that it generated. At one point, when I went into a long discussion with my colleague, the cigar went out and I had to relight it. It was as if nothing had happened. It re-lit with ease and continued to burn perfectly. Rarely do I find a cigar that can be re-lit on the first go and continue so easily. Construction appearance aside, it’s well made. This also has to be the one cigar that I got such a single long ash on, especially after a relight. The sweetness dissipated near the end, only to be replaced with a rich peppery taste. Tied in with that peppery was a stronger leather taste while the sweeter taste was relegated to the background. For a relatively small cigar, it packed a nice taste to it.

One thing that both disappointed me was the band. While I liked the simpler paper band and it was loose enough to remove, it did tear too easily. Next time I’ll just slip it off. All-in-all, a nice little discovery for myself and yet another cigar to add to my “I like list”.

Enjoyed with: Coffee and water

Smoke time: approximately 75 minutes

Final Review Rating: 8.5/10

 
 

Cigar Review: A sweet Morron Maduro

05 Jan

Cigar Name: H. Upmann 1844 Reserve Maduro (6 x 54)

Cigar Description: San Andrés Morron wrapper around Honduran and Nicaraguan fillers

Cigar Strength: Medium

Review of the Cigar itself: I picked up this cigar when I was in Charleston, SC from Tinderbox there. When I did a little background research on this, I noticed that Altadis U.S.A., the distributor of H.Upmann, defined the wrapper as a San Andres Morron wrapper. San Andres tobacco, out of the Mexican valley of the same name, has been pretty decent but what made me go “HUH?” was the term Morron. I hadn’t heard that used before. Doing a translation search got me, from Google, either morning (Swedish) or pepper, as in the vegetable (spanish). I’m inclined to think that rather than this being a strong peppery tobacco, this is a “sweeter” or gentler version. And it is.

The dark chocolate wrapper isn’t a strong peppery taste but more of a gentler version. The cigar itself felt pretty dense but it was very light in weight. I was a bit worried that it might be too tightly wrapped but found it to be tight enough to hold everything together without impeding on the flow of flavour. And it was a nice consistent flavour until I reached the nub. As I lit the foot, an easy aroma of coffee and cocoa with a hint of earthy tones yielded out from the cigar. It seemed a perfect match for an afternoon coffee, enough to keep me awake. I took a deep draw in and enjoyed the sweet flavours as they tickled the tastebuds. I’m usually a little put off by darker cigars because of the stronger peppery taste that hits the back of my tongue but this one was actually quite nice.

The band came off very easily (it actually remained in the cellophane when I removed the cigar). But the construction was very good. I was enjoying this cigar just as my online class began their labs. At one point, I got distracted and had to relight the cigar. It actually relit pretty easily and the flavours remained consistent, albeit a bit more muted in their flavour. It was nice that the burn on the cigar itself was fairly straight and rarely needed to be relit (as long as attention was given to it). As I got to the nub of the cigar, I noticed a stronger leather-pepper combination coming out and at that point, I called it a night.

While not overly complex a cigar, it was very enjoyable.

Enjoyed with: Coffee and water

Smoke time: approximately 75 minutes

Final Review Rating: 8.8/10

*pictures to be added later.

 
 
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